Carbon Monoxide Link Sends Elementary School Students To The Hospital

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Multiple ambulances dispatched to a KC elementary school, students sickened by carbon monoxide leak – KMBC Kansas City

A carbon monoxide leak caused several children to become sick at Longfellow Elementary School in Kansas City, Missouri. Six children and two adults were taken to area hospitals for treatment.

Carbon monoxide can build up indoors and become fatal at certain levels. Children were evacuated from the school and will be fed and kept warm at Manual Career and Technical Center.

The district sent text messages and emails to the parents of all Longfellow Elementary students about the situation, and most families were able to pick up their students at Manual Tech.

Fire crews believe the leak started in the boiler room and are working to determine the specific source of the leak.

Several ambulances and emergency units were dispatched to Longfellow Elementary School in Kansas City, Missouri, after several children were reportedly sickened by a carbon monoxide leak. Six children and two adults total were taken to area hospitals for treatment.

Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas produced when fuel is burned in cars, trucks, small engines, stoves, lanterns, grills, fireplaces, gas ranges or furnaces.

Fire crews are working to ventilate the building and determine the specific source of the leak, which may have started in the boiler room.

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